Thinking OT

Thoughts from Harrison Training and the occupational therapy world

Posts Tagged ‘OT Postgrad

Join Harrison Training for Free Online CPD Training

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Here at Harrison Training we have been looking at using online training facilities as another way of delivering our range of continuing professional development courses for occupational therapists.

We now invite you to join us for a complimentary CPD training session on Thursday 30th September.  We shall be running the presentation twice, at 1pm and again at the early evening slot of 7pm.

The topic will be a new 1 hour course “Communication in Occupational Therapy” exploring how we communicate with our clients and colleagues and the problems we encounter.

This  presentation is packed with stories and practical advice and will enable you to communicate more effectively to save time and improve relationships in your practice.

Attendees will be sent a 1 hour CPD certificate to confirm their participation and supporting notes.

If you would like to join us, at no cost, then contact us for more details.OK

We look forward to sharing this session with you.

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Online Training? Your Thoughts…

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I am looking at what people’s preferences are regarding accessing training online. Can you help?  The more information we have, the better we can tailor our courses to suit your needs.

There are 7 very short multiple choice questions here which will take literally seconds to complete.

Thank you.

Will NHS Reform Change You?

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The dust has settled to some extent following the announcement of the Liberating the NHS program for reform.

The political explosion has subsided and we will now enter a period of calmer appraisal and acceptance, with varying degrees of willingness.

If you have not yet read the government white paper then click here

Two issues stand out as they may relate to occupational therapists upon our brief initial reading, namely

  1. The Government will devolve power and responsibility for commissioning services to the healthcare professionals closest to patients: GPs and their practice teams working in consortia
  2. To strengthen democratic legitimacy at local level, local authorities will promote the joining up of local NHS services, social care and health improvement.

How do you think occupational therapists will we be employed, or if we work independently, to whom are we offering our services, and how will we do that?

Will it be the various GP consortia?  How will they be run?  Will they be self governing, as a local collective, or will they be administered by external, out-sourced services from the privte sector?

How will we be required to work between local authorities and these new consortia?

And what of this passage, for those who work with adults?

We want a sustainable adult social care system that gives people support and freedom to lead the life they choose, with dignity. We recognise the critical interdependence between the NHS and the adult social care system in securing better outcomes for people, including carers. We will seek to break down barriers between health and social care funding to encourage preventative action.

Bland rhetoric or meaningful promises?

Let us know your thoughts about what might happen.

Are you anxious, calm, indifferent, angry?

Perhaps you can see opportunity ahead.  Tell us in the comments.

Over to you.

Written by harrisontraining

July 15, 2010 at 11:54 am

The Emergency Budget and the Need For Effective Leadership

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The press are becoming increasingly frenzied as they build up to the new coalition government’s emergency budget next week.

The news is  – cuts, deeper than ever, no-one gets out alive and the like.

There can be no doubt that the health service will be challenged, along with everyone else.  Resources will become increasingly stretched.  These are going to be testing times.  The question is; how are we, and our teams going to respond?

Many will be feeling despair and fear.  For many of us the spectre of work cuts might be very real.

The climate is ripe for self destructive behaviour.

People clamour to make themselves indispensible so that if the axe falls it will not fall upon them.  This in turn can lead to an individualistic approach which is ill suited to healthcare provision.  Organisations experience politicisation of teams, where individuals look to recruit alliances, mutual support and canvass for themselves and their chosen candidates.

Gossip, rumour and finger pointing can increase just as morale decreases.

And yet this is a time that calls for leadership on both an individual and a team level.

How will we discipline ourselves so that we do not fall into the above patterns of behaviour?

Will we get support?  Consider personal coaching or, at the very least, reading some books that might help – Stephen Covey’s 7 habits of Highly Effective People is a world leader.  If some of the contents seem cheesy and clichéd then that is only because it is the leading book in its field.  It is only cheesy in the same way that Romeo and Juliet is.

How we govern ourselves, in a responsible and principled fashion, will enable us to remain focussed upon our roles and goals as we travel through the turbulence ahead.

The qualities and skills we develop as individual position quite naturally to be considered for future leadership roles.  What is more, leadership is not only a question of appointment or job title.  It is a question of character, skills, restraint and behaviours.  Many of those can be learnt.

If you can keep your head and hopes, keep your dreams and orientation true, then you will keep heading in the right direction, come what may.  Hopefully you will take others with you, both colleagues and those we are providing services to.

If we can help with leadership, conflict or team communications training then please do get in touch with us at Harrison Training or speak to us at the conference next week.

What Is Narrative Medicine?

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As I was reviewing the Mayo Clinic’s various social media channels (see my earlier blog post here) I came across this blog post by former patient/client Jillayn Hey.

Click through on the picture to read the blog in full

That in turn led me to this interview of Lewis Mehl-Madrona and his thoughts on Narrative Medicine.

The article suggests that “Narrative Medicine…asserts the importance of an individual’s whole life story to the person’s health-not just the medical history, but a story that includes ancestors and friends, interests and spiritual orientation.”

Given that the subtitle to this blog is “Thoughts, observations and provocations from the occupational therapy world” I thought this would make for good debate.

To what extent do we agree the premise?

The narrative movement can be seen in many disciplines other than medicine.  Another example can be found in narrative mediation, for example, as a dispute resolution process.

Allow me to break out of the OT silo for a moment, and look over to see what they do there.

Within narrative mediation the conflict that disputants find themselves in is held up as being a story that they are involved in.  Referring to the dispute, or, here, the question of illness or wellbeing, as a story is not intended to diminish how real that situation is.

The “Story” label, however, allows mediators, or maybe practitioners, to deconstruct the story.

  • Who are the players in this story? 
  • Who else is effected by it?
  • What is the plot? 
  • Crucially, what is the outcome?
  • How are we using language to tell this story?
  • How else might we re-tell the story, perhaps to a different audience?

A powerful part of narrative mediation, and I can see no reason why it would not have an impact here, is to set up the problem – the dispute or illness – as an entity within the story.  that in turn enables us to ask questions such as

  • How did this thing called conflict lead you to feel or react?
  • When conflict was around, did you notice anything different?
  • How did the pain invite you to respond to others?

That line of questioning can be developed further

  • What was your relationship like before conflict arrived on the scene?
  • How did you imagine your career progressing before the illness?
  • Can you think of a time when the illness didn’t have stop you from doing something?

and further still by asking

  • Am I right in thinking that you would rather this conflict was not ongoing, that you would like to see an end to it?
  • If so, what other ways might you react when conflict appears? What might you do differently?

and so on.

As the dialogue is developed, conflict, or illness, is first recognised as having an impact on our lives and behaviour.  We then go further and look at how we can explicitly recognise the grasp that it has upon us and how we can start to loosen its grip. 

In the words of Winslade and Monk, authors of Narrative Mediation, we then allow room for alternative, newly created and more helpful narratives, or stories to be constructed by ourselves and retold to others. 

In the words of Jillayn Hey herself “Through telling our personal stories of illness and disease, we assist in creating a new story of wellness that facilitates healing and in turn directs a person towards recovery.”  Note how Jillayn explicitly speaks of her new wellness.  In doing so she brings her new symptoms of being well to the foreground.  If she had not done so, then the grasp, or the narrative, that her former condition had on her own expectations of what it is to live day to day might have continued and therefore limited her activities and perceptions.

What are your thoughts?

Managing Conflict in Occupational Therapy

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Harrison Training rolled out their Managing Conflict in Occupational Therapy course earlier this week.  This continues the development of Harrison’s interest in NHS and health care management skills training.

It became apparent that we all experience conflict within our work.  That is not surprising.  Conflict is in all that we do, whether professionally or socially.  We need to recognise where the potential for conflict lies and what our likely responses to it will be.

The mindmap shown above is one of the training resources that we used.  We highlighted nine types of conflict and then explored how they might arise within healthcare work, whether between colleagues, different levels of organisational hierarchy or with our clients.

We were able to explore typical responses and strategies to unblocking conflicts and also explore how our own actions often contribute to the conflict at hand.  The language we use, how we perceive ourselves within a conflict and who we speak to about it can all shape the destiny of any given situation.

The shift from blaming one another to an appreciation of how we might all be contributing to a problem is often a very powerful.  It makes the conflict safer to discuss and resolve.

By providing conflict awareness skills, team members can understand and anticipate possible conflict and where it might arise.  The result is that when it does emerge we are not taken by surprise and we have a range of lenses through which to perceive the problem.  That, coupled with practical strategies for resolution can help to cut the cost of conflict within our teams and organisations.

The course was very well received and prompted a great deal of discussion – the whole day felt like one massive conversation.

NHS Cuts, Budgets and That Thing Called Leadership

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Leadership needs to be inside out, not back to front.

With the imminent election, and even more imminent budget, the future funding of the NHS, and possible NHS spending cuts is a real hot topic.

In my previous post I highlighted the NHS Confederation’s report on Rising to the Challenge.

I have just been recapping their fascinating series on leadership from Spring 2009.

The fact that there are going to be massive cuts and the need for efficiency drives within the NHS is a given.  It is going to be unavoidable, as it will be in any other public sector.  What is not clear is how the system, and the individuals within it, will respond to those changes.

It is a time for leadership to come to the fore on a corporate and individual basis.

Leadership needs to be inside out, not back to front.

What is back to front leadership?

Back to front leadership is reactionary knee jerkism.  Back to front leadership only looks ahead at what is to come and reacts to it.

It is like reading the last page of a novel and guessing what might happen in the other 250 pages for yourself to fit with the conclusion you have just seen.

It is reactionary and often misguided.  The steps that are taken might match the predicted outcome (reduced costs) but may make no sense along the way.

Inside out leadership is different.

It still sees what the big picture is – there is no self deception or self comforting delusion here.  However it then works from the inside outwards to ensure that the necessary re-organisation fits the outcome and is consistent and coherent throughout the organisation.

This is much more challenging.  It requires the ability of managers and leaders (very different roles by the way) to be able to communicate, reassure, be honest and yet still move the team forward.  It takes courage to make those unattractive decisions.  There is no room here for procrastination or avoiding tough decisions and the subsequent conflict that will arise.

These leadership traits are not simply required in those we follow or look to for guidance and decision-making.  We can all develop leadership qualities ourselves and, as we do so, then we strengthen our own positions within our teams, employment but also within our personal lives and decision making.

Personal leadership also needs to be inside out, not back to front.

As we challenge ourselves to face up to several years of turmoil within the NHS , we have a choice.

We can read the writing on the wall and despair.  Maybe some will just give up, or others will keep a low profile hoping not to be noticed in any cutbacks.  That is the back to front approach.

The inside out approach to self leadership will be to look at ourselves.

What is it that we do really well?

Where can we improve?

What value and importance do we offer to our clients?

What value and importance do we derive for ourselves from what we do?

What is it that really fires us up?

Where do you want to be in say 3 to 5 years time, rather than where do you think the system will leave you in 5 years time?

These are all internal questions but they will have a profound impact and shape your external presentation.

If you are sure of why you do what you do, and if you have a vision for your career which is rooted to your values then you will be seen as someone to be kept hold of, and even promoted as and when opportunities continue to arise.

People will see you as bold, courageous.  You will be called inspirational.  People will turn to you for your opinion and guidance.

You become sought after and increasingly central to your team or organisation.

You will not avoid the tough times ahead but will be better positioned to roll with them, take the blows and carry on forward instead of falling into despair.  This resilience will, again, position you as a natural leader within your organisation as a result of developing your internal self leadership characteristics.

Here at Harrison Training we are continuing to expand our leadership skills training program for occupational therapists and other health care workers at all levels of seniority.  Let us know if this is something that you would like to bring into your organisation, or access personally, to help you and your people rise to the challenges that are to come.