Thinking OT

Thoughts from Harrison Training and the occupational therapy world

Posts Tagged ‘harrison training

Join Harrison Training for Free Online CPD Training

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Here at Harrison Training we have been looking at using online training facilities as another way of delivering our range of continuing professional development courses for occupational therapists.

We now invite you to join us for a complimentary CPD training session on Thursday 30th September.  We shall be running the presentation twice, at 1pm and again at the early evening slot of 7pm.

The topic will be a new 1 hour course “Communication in Occupational Therapy” exploring how we communicate with our clients and colleagues and the problems we encounter.

This  presentation is packed with stories and practical advice and will enable you to communicate more effectively to save time and improve relationships in your practice.

Attendees will be sent a 1 hour CPD certificate to confirm their participation and supporting notes.

If you would like to join us, at no cost, then contact us for more details.OK

We look forward to sharing this session with you.


Online Training? Your Thoughts…

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I am looking at what people’s preferences are regarding accessing training online. Can you help?  The more information we have, the better we can tailor our courses to suit your needs.

There are 7 very short multiple choice questions here which will take literally seconds to complete.

Thank you.

What is Occupational Therapy To You?

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The walk to Harrison Training's offices/ What Is Occupational Therapy?

View From The Bridge

I love coming to work at Harrison Training’s offices here in Bradford on Avon.

The walk from the station takes you across the river, filled with waterlillies and cool promises.

From there you go through the old part of town with its stunning Georgian properties and then walk past the church and up some steps, worn through centuries of use.

Steps leading to Harrison TrainingIt is hard not to imagine the lives that have been lived here over the years.

And then my thoughts shift.

How fortunate we are, those of us able to take these walks and enjoy our surroundings because, let there be no doubt, for all of the beauty in this town, accessibility must be a nightmare.

Inevitably, perhaps, I am drawn once again by this consideration of accessibility, to that old chestnut of a question – What is occupational therapy?

Take me as an example.  I am able to draw meaning, pleasure and fulfilment from being in, walking through and interacting with these surroundings.  And I wonder, is that the point?  Is that what occupational therapy is?

When we enable, reable, rehabilitate, when occupation is not career or work, but being meaningfully occupied, or stimulated, is this what we do?

Forgive me my more metaphysical ramblings this morning, but please share your thoughts.

What is it that you do when you do what you do?  What is occupational therapy to you?



Award Winning Accolade For Therese Jackson, Harrison Training Associate.

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Harrison Training Associate and leading stroke care practitioner, Therese Jackson, has been awarded the Excellence in Stroke Care award by the Stroke Association.


This is an auspicious award, recognising “exceptional service in the provision of stroke care.”

You can read Therese’s full associate details here, on the Harrison Training website.

We recommend visiting the Stroke Associations website.  They have produced a very impressive set of videos paying tribute to all of their award winners.  To see all the videos, click here,  to see Therese’s award winning video, click here.


How Do You Solve A Problem Like Absenteeism?

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Upon reading through our Twitter account this morning, I spotted this comment from Alyson Fennemore

How Much Does Absenteeism Cost Organisations? What About The NHS?

Reading the summary  report from XpertHR reveals that the cost of absenteeism within the public sector is “significantly higher” than in the private sector.

That is perhaps no surprise.

Further reading around the issue suggests that represents about 6 days sick leave every year in the private sector, per employee.

An earlier article, from the same source, puts public sector absenteeism, in 2009, at a whopping 9.7 days per year.

That might be a surprise.  Many people will read that and think “I haven’t been sick in years.”  Others are less fortunate though and find their working life and aspirations beset with absence.

I have recently been presenting to several NHS teams for Harrison Training, both to OT and mixed discipline teams, and they are invariably affected with absenteeism.

I’ll write later about how absenteeism ties in with the current economic climate.

I would love to hear, in the comments below, how absenteeism impacts upon your teams and your own ability to carry out your work effectively.

And what is your answer to the problem?

Thanks to Alyson for providing the original link in her tweet.


Written by harrisontraining

July 8, 2010 at 9:35 am

Challenging How We Think About OT – “Occupational Therapy Without Borders”

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As I was reading through recently updated blogs from the OT blogs I follow, I came across this post from Salford University’s blog.

This line, in particular, caught my attention;

“An hour of so spent chatting with Frank Kronenberg (a newly appointed Honorary Professor at Salford) has possibly turned much about how we think of our profession on its head – but that´s for another post – we need time to reflect and assimilate before going public with this very radical view!”

Curious?  I know I am.

Frank Kronenberg is the co-editor of the book; “Occupational Therapy Without Borders. Learning From The Spirit of Survivors”

You can click through to Amazon for more details, but the description reads;

“This book challenges occupational therapists, members of a still small and rather invisible profession, to more fully realize the profession’s social vision of a more just society where disability, old age, and other marginalizing conditions and experiences are addressed by involving people in helping themselves to (re)gain the capacity and power to construct their own destinies through their participation in daily life. The book will explore the new idea of occupational apartheid – the separation between those who have meaningful, useful occupations and those who are deprived of, isolated from, or otherwise constrained in their daily life.”

There is only one review but it is very positive stating that “OT Without Borders is a really refreshing OT book. It really explores OT out of the usual settings, and isn’t bogged down in the usual ‘what do we do?’, ‘does anyone know what we do?’, ‘does anyone care???!'”

Quite a rallying cry for the profession and if Frank Kronenberg is continuing to develop these thoughts then it may well present a challenge to how occupational therapists perceive their role and identity.

If you have read the book, let us know your thoughts.


Social Media in Occupational Therapy. Why Bother?

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Here at Harrison Training, we are discovering more fascinating OT blogs every week.

Today we came across Kara, a newly qualified occupational therapist in America, and her very personal and intimate blog “Be the change you wish to see in the world”

This particular post, “Another chapter in my book of life” impressed for several reasons, the first of which is this;

Many of you may have seen this already, judging by the massive number of viewings this clip has had, but it bears repeating because it is so charming.  It also demonstrates one of the powers of social media within occupational therapy.

The YouTube video is so evocative in setting up a vision, an aspiration of what older adult life can be like.  In doing so, it challenges our preconceptions about older people, their needs and what we might expect for ourselves in the years to come.

Other reasons for the success of the “Another chapter..” post by Kara, and social media generally, is that Kara talks about why she is passionate about her work.  She can pass on the YouTube video and in doing so relay that story but she also uses social media to pass on other memorable stories… The dead body of Mussolini hanging upside down from a tree, anyone.

But so what?  Why bother?  What is in it for Kara?

Probably nothing tangible, nothing that can be counted in pounds and pence, or dollars and dimes, or at least not yet.

But we all have a need to tell these stories, to hand them on.

In doing so, isn’t she honouring the gifts that her clients have to offer?

Kara is adding to the occupational therapy and healthcare community by sharing optimistic viewpoints but also, elsewhere on her blog, sharing challenges that she is facing.

Maybe we’re just being overly sentimental here, but we believe that social media has a critical role to play for all of us,  in our work and development as OTs and health care professionals.  We need the OT community to be fully effective so that we can support and encourage one another.  After all, there may be trouble ahead.

There are also benefits for our clients.  In a second article, next week, we will look at the Mayo Clinic from which this video stems, the work that they are doing with social media, some of the downsides but also the benefits.