Thinking OT

Thoughts from Harrison Training and the occupational therapy world

Archive for the ‘Creativity within Occupational Therapy’ Category

Blogging and Social Networking in the NHS – Change Needed

with 5 comments

OTNews have a brief and dispiriting article this month on page 10, entitled Blogging and social networking.  I am grateful that this article was brought to my attention as I prepare for a very popular workshop on Social Media Usage at next week’s COTSS Independent Practice conference next week.  I think we can have some fun with this…

The article runs off a litany of reasons why blogging and social networking is bad.  To summarise they are

  • breaches of confidentiality
  • information leaks
  • defamation
  • damage to organisational reputation
  • information to be used for social engineering and identity theft
  • viruses and other malware
  • bandwidth consumption resulting in degrading services and wasting time for other users
  • intimidation of NHS staff leading to investigations.

The article goes on to state that you can download the full checklist (what, there’s more?!) here.

I am not sure what the motive behind the article was, not least because the College is actually quite active in this field itself.  It just pops up in the news pages, even though the guidelines referred to date back to December 2009.

The disappointment in it is that it reads in the most reactionary terms.  It comes across as being anti-progress by only listing the woebetides and the why nots.

Where is the debate about how we can manage risk and progress?  Where is the discussion on the opportunities that become available?

For all your threats above I give you my own list.

Watch out for social media and blogging.  It can result in:-

  • collaboration
  • innovation
  • education
  • integration
  • creativity
  • community
  • encouragement
  • support
  • development
  • efficiencies
  • knowledge management
  • best practice…
Advertisements

Written by harrisontraining

October 7, 2010 at 3:14 pm

We make sense of the world depending upon our experiences of it.

leave a comment »

There are a great couple of posts over at the A Voice In The OT Wilderness blog.

Part one is here.

Part two is here.

The story revolves around a conflict arising from a client’s non-compliance with a specified art exercise.  When asked to create a collage, one user, instead, created a 3D model.

This was used by one observer as evidence of that client’s “defiance” – a chilling thought redolent of One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest.  There was a fascinating reason however for the deviation between the expectation of the observer and the interpretation and actions of the client.

The story reminds us that although we might be absolutely clear about communicating what we are asking clients to do, they, being the recipient of the message, receive the message and interpret it through their own filters.

Those filters are, in turn, shaped and coloured by their life experiences.

Go to Allie Hafez’ A Voice In The OT Wilderness blog now and read the story for yourself.

Challenge What I Think

leave a comment »

Changing What We Think

I thought was going to write about the NHS Confedration’s consultation paper, and looking in particular at the consortia that service purchasers, previously known as GPs, will be obliged to join.  I might get onto that later.

Instead I got distracted by a curious search that has come up on the blog stats.  It read;

“Challenge what I think”

Someone had searched for “Challenge what I think” and Google, in its infinite algorithmic wisdom sent them here.

That set in motion a chain of thought.  How readily do we open ourselves to being challenged in what we think?

The two topics are not entirely disconnected.  The angle I was contemplating on NHS reform was that it is easy to get stuck in resistance, anger and opposition.  We might rail against the system on the basis that it is

  • Wasteful
  • A broken promise
  • Unnecessary
  • Politically motivated
  • Unworkable
  • Meddling
  • Unwelcome change

or we can recognise that the march of this reform is inevitable.  Once we do that then the challenge is not to change the system or the political tide, but to look to ourselves and change how we are going to respond to it and engage with that change.

Note the word “Respond” as opposed to “React”

For those who are employed within the NHS, then we need to consider our roles within our teams.  How can we bring greater value, not just in pounds and pence, but in contribution?  What skills can we tap into to make our contributions more meaningful?

This has motivated the previous posts about self-effectiveness, or self leadership.  How can we position ourselves as being central to a team’s effectiveness, but not in a destructive way that undermines others, but constructively, helping to support and improve the whole.

For independent practitioners, how are you going to position yourselves in order to market your services to a larger number of smaller purchasers?  What do you need to do to demonstrate utility, effectiveness and ensure (to use the current buzzword) improved outcomes.

The current uncertainty needs us to remain adaptable.  It might mean getting to grips with social media – and the momentum that is now seen within social media and occupational therapy is very exciting.

It might mean, depending on how the consultation goes, that we need to be much more commercial in selling ourselves.

For some, let’s be realistic, it might mean looking for new roles altogether.

All of this needs us to be open to be challenged about the way we think.

We need to break the well worn patterns of X leads to Y and therefore Z applies. Experience shapes our responses so that if we find ourselves facing a situation we anticipate the outcome will the same as last time.  That can often drive how we respond.

And yet the outcome, to some extent, is shaped by our intervening response.  What if we choose, therefore, a different response?

What options have we got to select from?

What responses have we not tried previously and how might they serve us, and our service users and clients, better?

What new responses can we create for ourselves?

For more on this consider the issue of heuristics – there is a good summary on Wikipedia, right here.

The Meaning In Occupation

leave a comment »

The Meaning of Occupation? Just Doing.

The “What is Occupational Therapy To You?” post last week attracted quite a bit of attention both within the occupational therapy sector, but also from non-OTs.

You can follow the discussion there and see that the conversation in the comments.

I thought, when I wrote the article, that I was talking about that old chestnut of an argument, “What is OT?”  Readers however were more interested in the question “What do you DO?”

Jouyin Teoh, a blogger at OT on OT challenged us to drill down further and focus on the “occupation” within occupational therapy. 

When we talk about occupation within OT we use it in a sense that has no sense outside of our spheres.  To the rest of the world your occupation is “Yer job” and nothing more.  The common misconception that occupational therapists are people who only help you get back to work makes perfect sense accordingly.

When we consider “What do we do to give our lives meaning ?” then we are far more aligned to the client and their world view. 

So how can we open up this idea of occupation as just doing or being?

Quite by accident I followed up last week’s “What is…” post with an article looking at occupational therapy issues on Flickr . The thought occurs to me that we could share and celebrate what it is that we do by way of photography.

To that end, I have set up a Flickr Group page called “Occupation… just doing“.  I have seeded it with some photos of varing quality from my own collection.  These are photos of doing, or being, even the mundane things, which give meaning to our lives.

Why not share some of yours?  Take photos, whether on your mobile phone or dedicated camera, of you, or people you know, just doing things.  Let’s celebrate these things we do and get a broader understanding of what it is that we do, when we do what do.

This is not a competition, and there is no need for excellence.  This is simply about sharing and celebrating the joy of occupation.

The Lesser Known Fringes of Social Media and OT

with one comment

My last post featured some photos I took on my way into the office.

At the time the pictures led me to think about this thing that we call occupation.

I subsequently went to www.flickr.com and posted the photos on there.

Flickr is a lesser known fringe of social media.  It is specifically designed to enable people to share photos.

While I was there I went to see what communities had gathered around occupational therapy.  There are a few galleries from AOTA and others, and a few stand out photographs.

Try these two for starters;

http://www.flickr.com/photos/b17flygirl/444094561/in/pool-occupationaltherapy

and this one;

http://www.flickr.com/photos/leaaaaah/458597582/in/pool-enabledbydesign

Feel free yourself to use the search bar on the  www.flickr.com website and see if there are pictures that inspire or move you.

Opening an account is straightforward if you are inclined to pitch in and get involved.

Different social media platforms present very different uses and opportunities.  Enabling clients to share their photography and visions could well have therapeutic intervention aspects.  Over to you to think that through.

Written by harrisontraining

August 2, 2010 at 10:00 am

What is Occupational Therapy To You?

with 6 comments

The walk to Harrison Training's offices/ What Is Occupational Therapy?

View From The Bridge

I love coming to work at Harrison Training’s offices here in Bradford on Avon.

The walk from the station takes you across the river, filled with waterlillies and cool promises.

From there you go through the old part of town with its stunning Georgian properties and then walk past the church and up some steps, worn through centuries of use.

Steps leading to Harrison TrainingIt is hard not to imagine the lives that have been lived here over the years.

And then my thoughts shift.

How fortunate we are, those of us able to take these walks and enjoy our surroundings because, let there be no doubt, for all of the beauty in this town, accessibility must be a nightmare.

Inevitably, perhaps, I am drawn once again by this consideration of accessibility, to that old chestnut of a question – What is occupational therapy?

Take me as an example.  I am able to draw meaning, pleasure and fulfilment from being in, walking through and interacting with these surroundings.  And I wonder, is that the point?  Is that what occupational therapy is?

When we enable, reable, rehabilitate, when occupation is not career or work, but being meaningfully occupied, or stimulated, is this what we do?

Forgive me my more metaphysical ramblings this morning, but please share your thoughts.

What is it that you do when you do what you do?  What is occupational therapy to you?

Waterlillies

Is The Wii Useful?

with 3 comments

There is an article in this month’s OT News magazine (click here) discussing a pilot scheme using the Nintendo Wii games console with individuals who have mild learning difficulties.

It is an interesting article even though the pilot scheme was unsuccessful.  There were only eight proposed members of the group, only six turned up and, of those, only one turned up regularly.

The experiences of the group, or rather those who were leading it, highlight some serious shortfalls in the Wii hardware.  These are not critical, I think, but do need to be recognised.

The Nintendo Wii has caused quite a stir with it’s motion sensitive controls.  Rather than pressing a button to control an on screen character, you physically move and manipulate a controller held in your hand.   Other developments include the Wii Fit board which measures weight, balance and shifts in balance.

There are several games including the ubiquitous Wii Sports which are designed to be played in a more physical fashion, even standing up and leaping around your immaculately tidy and hyper-lifestyle designed living room if the TV ads are to be believed.

This physicality has led to the Wii being applied in various settings to motivate individuals to become more active.

The current project though failed on a couple of fronts.

Users became frustrated with the time it took to swap between players using the Wii Fit program.  It is a time consuming task which entails clicking through several screens.  This can sometimes take longer than it takes to play the activity itself.

Wii Fit is largely an individual system, which may well be better suited to one on one sessions.  The sequel, Wii Fit Plus, has got usability improvements which remove some of the time taken to change between participants which might alleviate issues within group sessions.

The other problem which the Wii presents stems directly from the motion control technology.

The promise of direct control over your on-screen character is an abstracted illusion.

By this I mean that you do not, despite all the hype, have direct control over your character, but only elements of their actions.

Take the famous tennis game from Wii Sports, for example.  You cannot direct where you hit the ball by changing the angle of the controller, as you would with a tennis racquet.  The direction is, instead, determined by how early or late you strike the ball – early plays it to the left of the court, later to the right.

For those of us who game as a hobby this is not a problem, but non-experienced gamers will perceive that they are being offered direct control.  The result can be very frustrating.

Again, the Wii technology continues to evolve and you may well well want to look at the Wii Sports sequel called Wii Sports Resort.  This comes complete with a new widget to attach to the original controller which brings your physical actions closer to the on-screen representation.

A word of warning though;  Do not get started on the Table Tennis service return game.  It is incredibly, marriage threateningly, addictive!

Another problem is highlighted by the original article, namely frustration at a perception that “The machine is not working properly.”  The controls on the Wii, and especially the Wii Fit balance board, are incredibly sensitive and actually require quite a high degree of balance shifting, stability and control.  This can be underestimated.

The Wii should not be abandoned as a possible device for therapy or motivation activity.  Once its limitations are recognised, acknowledged and accommodated the Wii can be great fun, social and energetic.  This will require practitioners to become fully familiar with the system before introducing it to service users, but, hey, there are worse home work assignments.

Do be aware that Sony and Microsoft are both bringing out new motion sensing systems for their Playstation 3 and Xbox 360 which might provide a more seamless interface.

Also be sure to read this excellent blog, albeit not updated since March on WiiHabTherapy.