Thinking OT

Thoughts from Harrison Training and the occupational therapy world

Archive for August 2010

We make sense of the world depending upon our experiences of it.

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There are a great couple of posts over at the A Voice In The OT Wilderness blog.

Part one is here.

Part two is here.

The story revolves around a conflict arising from a client’s non-compliance with a specified art exercise.  When asked to create a collage, one user, instead, created a 3D model.

This was used by one observer as evidence of that client’s “defiance” – a chilling thought redolent of One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest.  There was a fascinating reason however for the deviation between the expectation of the observer and the interpretation and actions of the client.

The story reminds us that although we might be absolutely clear about communicating what we are asking clients to do, they, being the recipient of the message, receive the message and interpret it through their own filters.

Those filters are, in turn, shaped and coloured by their life experiences.

Go to Allie Hafez’ A Voice In The OT Wilderness blog now and read the story for yourself.

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Online Training? Your Thoughts…

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I am looking at what people’s preferences are regarding accessing training online. Can you help?  The more information we have, the better we can tailor our courses to suit your needs.

There are 7 very short multiple choice questions here which will take literally seconds to complete.

Thank you.

Challenge What I Think

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Changing What We Think

I thought was going to write about the NHS Confedration’s consultation paper, and looking in particular at the consortia that service purchasers, previously known as GPs, will be obliged to join.  I might get onto that later.

Instead I got distracted by a curious search that has come up on the blog stats.  It read;

“Challenge what I think”

Someone had searched for “Challenge what I think” and Google, in its infinite algorithmic wisdom sent them here.

That set in motion a chain of thought.  How readily do we open ourselves to being challenged in what we think?

The two topics are not entirely disconnected.  The angle I was contemplating on NHS reform was that it is easy to get stuck in resistance, anger and opposition.  We might rail against the system on the basis that it is

  • Wasteful
  • A broken promise
  • Unnecessary
  • Politically motivated
  • Unworkable
  • Meddling
  • Unwelcome change

or we can recognise that the march of this reform is inevitable.  Once we do that then the challenge is not to change the system or the political tide, but to look to ourselves and change how we are going to respond to it and engage with that change.

Note the word “Respond” as opposed to “React”

For those who are employed within the NHS, then we need to consider our roles within our teams.  How can we bring greater value, not just in pounds and pence, but in contribution?  What skills can we tap into to make our contributions more meaningful?

This has motivated the previous posts about self-effectiveness, or self leadership.  How can we position ourselves as being central to a team’s effectiveness, but not in a destructive way that undermines others, but constructively, helping to support and improve the whole.

For independent practitioners, how are you going to position yourselves in order to market your services to a larger number of smaller purchasers?  What do you need to do to demonstrate utility, effectiveness and ensure (to use the current buzzword) improved outcomes.

The current uncertainty needs us to remain adaptable.  It might mean getting to grips with social media – and the momentum that is now seen within social media and occupational therapy is very exciting.

It might mean, depending on how the consultation goes, that we need to be much more commercial in selling ourselves.

For some, let’s be realistic, it might mean looking for new roles altogether.

All of this needs us to be open to be challenged about the way we think.

We need to break the well worn patterns of X leads to Y and therefore Z applies. Experience shapes our responses so that if we find ourselves facing a situation we anticipate the outcome will the same as last time.  That can often drive how we respond.

And yet the outcome, to some extent, is shaped by our intervening response.  What if we choose, therefore, a different response?

What options have we got to select from?

What responses have we not tried previously and how might they serve us, and our service users and clients, better?

What new responses can we create for ourselves?

For more on this consider the issue of heuristics – there is a good summary on Wikipedia, right here.

The Meaning In Occupation

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The Meaning of Occupation? Just Doing.

The “What is Occupational Therapy To You?” post last week attracted quite a bit of attention both within the occupational therapy sector, but also from non-OTs.

You can follow the discussion there and see that the conversation in the comments.

I thought, when I wrote the article, that I was talking about that old chestnut of an argument, “What is OT?”  Readers however were more interested in the question “What do you DO?”

Jouyin Teoh, a blogger at OT on OT challenged us to drill down further and focus on the “occupation” within occupational therapy. 

When we talk about occupation within OT we use it in a sense that has no sense outside of our spheres.  To the rest of the world your occupation is “Yer job” and nothing more.  The common misconception that occupational therapists are people who only help you get back to work makes perfect sense accordingly.

When we consider “What do we do to give our lives meaning ?” then we are far more aligned to the client and their world view. 

So how can we open up this idea of occupation as just doing or being?

Quite by accident I followed up last week’s “What is…” post with an article looking at occupational therapy issues on Flickr . The thought occurs to me that we could share and celebrate what it is that we do by way of photography.

To that end, I have set up a Flickr Group page called “Occupation… just doing“.  I have seeded it with some photos of varing quality from my own collection.  These are photos of doing, or being, even the mundane things, which give meaning to our lives.

Why not share some of yours?  Take photos, whether on your mobile phone or dedicated camera, of you, or people you know, just doing things.  Let’s celebrate these things we do and get a broader understanding of what it is that we do, when we do what do.

This is not a competition, and there is no need for excellence.  This is simply about sharing and celebrating the joy of occupation.

The Lesser Known Fringes of Social Media and OT

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My last post featured some photos I took on my way into the office.

At the time the pictures led me to think about this thing that we call occupation.

I subsequently went to www.flickr.com and posted the photos on there.

Flickr is a lesser known fringe of social media.  It is specifically designed to enable people to share photos.

While I was there I went to see what communities had gathered around occupational therapy.  There are a few galleries from AOTA and others, and a few stand out photographs.

Try these two for starters;

http://www.flickr.com/photos/b17flygirl/444094561/in/pool-occupationaltherapy

and this one;

http://www.flickr.com/photos/leaaaaah/458597582/in/pool-enabledbydesign

Feel free yourself to use the search bar on the  www.flickr.com website and see if there are pictures that inspire or move you.

Opening an account is straightforward if you are inclined to pitch in and get involved.

Different social media platforms present very different uses and opportunities.  Enabling clients to share their photography and visions could well have therapeutic intervention aspects.  Over to you to think that through.

Written by harrisontraining

August 2, 2010 at 10:00 am