Thinking OT

Thoughts from Harrison Training and the occupational therapy world

Archive for July 2010

What is Occupational Therapy To You?

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The walk to Harrison Training's offices/ What Is Occupational Therapy?

View From The Bridge

I love coming to work at Harrison Training’s offices here in Bradford on Avon.

The walk from the station takes you across the river, filled with waterlillies and cool promises.

From there you go through the old part of town with its stunning Georgian properties and then walk past the church and up some steps, worn through centuries of use.

Steps leading to Harrison TrainingIt is hard not to imagine the lives that have been lived here over the years.

And then my thoughts shift.

How fortunate we are, those of us able to take these walks and enjoy our surroundings because, let there be no doubt, for all of the beauty in this town, accessibility must be a nightmare.

Inevitably, perhaps, I am drawn once again by this consideration of accessibility, to that old chestnut of a question – What is occupational therapy?

Take me as an example.  I am able to draw meaning, pleasure and fulfilment from being in, walking through and interacting with these surroundings.  And I wonder, is that the point?  Is that what occupational therapy is?

When we enable, reable, rehabilitate, when occupation is not career or work, but being meaningfully occupied, or stimulated, is this what we do?

Forgive me my more metaphysical ramblings this morning, but please share your thoughts.

What is it that you do when you do what you do?  What is occupational therapy to you?



Will NHS Reform Change You?

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The dust has settled to some extent following the announcement of the Liberating the NHS program for reform.

The political explosion has subsided and we will now enter a period of calmer appraisal and acceptance, with varying degrees of willingness.

If you have not yet read the government white paper then click here

Two issues stand out as they may relate to occupational therapists upon our brief initial reading, namely

  1. The Government will devolve power and responsibility for commissioning services to the healthcare professionals closest to patients: GPs and their practice teams working in consortia
  2. To strengthen democratic legitimacy at local level, local authorities will promote the joining up of local NHS services, social care and health improvement.

How do you think occupational therapists will we be employed, or if we work independently, to whom are we offering our services, and how will we do that?

Will it be the various GP consortia?  How will they be run?  Will they be self governing, as a local collective, or will they be administered by external, out-sourced services from the privte sector?

How will we be required to work between local authorities and these new consortia?

And what of this passage, for those who work with adults?

We want a sustainable adult social care system that gives people support and freedom to lead the life they choose, with dignity. We recognise the critical interdependence between the NHS and the adult social care system in securing better outcomes for people, including carers. We will seek to break down barriers between health and social care funding to encourage preventative action.

Bland rhetoric or meaningful promises?

Let us know your thoughts about what might happen.

Are you anxious, calm, indifferent, angry?

Perhaps you can see opportunity ahead.  Tell us in the comments.

Over to you.

Written by harrisontraining

July 15, 2010 at 11:54 am

Award Winning Accolade For Therese Jackson, Harrison Training Associate.

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Harrison Training Associate and leading stroke care practitioner, Therese Jackson, has been awarded the Excellence in Stroke Care award by the Stroke Association.


This is an auspicious award, recognising “exceptional service in the provision of stroke care.”

You can read Therese’s full associate details here, on the Harrison Training website.

We recommend visiting the Stroke Associations website.  They have produced a very impressive set of videos paying tribute to all of their award winners.  To see all the videos, click here,  to see Therese’s award winning video, click here.


How Do You Solve A Problem Like Absenteeism?

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Upon reading through our Twitter account this morning, I spotted this comment from Alyson Fennemore

How Much Does Absenteeism Cost Organisations? What About The NHS?

Reading the summary  report from XpertHR reveals that the cost of absenteeism within the public sector is “significantly higher” than in the private sector.

That is perhaps no surprise.

Further reading around the issue suggests that represents about 6 days sick leave every year in the private sector, per employee.

An earlier article, from the same source, puts public sector absenteeism, in 2009, at a whopping 9.7 days per year.

That might be a surprise.  Many people will read that and think “I haven’t been sick in years.”  Others are less fortunate though and find their working life and aspirations beset with absence.

I have recently been presenting to several NHS teams for Harrison Training, both to OT and mixed discipline teams, and they are invariably affected with absenteeism.

I’ll write later about how absenteeism ties in with the current economic climate.

I would love to hear, in the comments below, how absenteeism impacts upon your teams and your own ability to carry out your work effectively.

And what is your answer to the problem?

Thanks to Alyson for providing the original link in her tweet.


Written by harrisontraining

July 8, 2010 at 9:35 am