Thinking OT

Thoughts from Harrison Training and the occupational therapy world

Blogging and Social Networking in the NHS – Change Needed

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OTNews have a brief and dispiriting article this month on page 10, entitled Blogging and social networking.  I am grateful that this article was brought to my attention as I prepare for a very popular workshop on Social Media Usage at next week’s COTSS Independent Practice conference next week.  I think we can have some fun with this…

The article runs off a litany of reasons why blogging and social networking is bad.  To summarise they are

  • breaches of confidentiality
  • information leaks
  • defamation
  • damage to organisational reputation
  • information to be used for social engineering and identity theft
  • viruses and other malware
  • bandwidth consumption resulting in degrading services and wasting time for other users
  • intimidation of NHS staff leading to investigations.

The article goes on to state that you can download the full checklist (what, there’s more?!) here.

I am not sure what the motive behind the article was, not least because the College is actually quite active in this field itself.  It just pops up in the news pages, even though the guidelines referred to date back to December 2009.

The disappointment in it is that it reads in the most reactionary terms.  It comes across as being anti-progress by only listing the woebetides and the why nots.

Where is the debate about how we can manage risk and progress?  Where is the discussion on the opportunities that become available?

For all your threats above I give you my own list.

Watch out for social media and blogging.  It can result in:-

  • collaboration
  • innovation
  • education
  • integration
  • creativity
  • community
  • encouragement
  • support
  • development
  • efficiencies
  • knowledge management
  • best practice…

Written by harrisontraining

October 7, 2010 at 3:14 pm

What Does Occupation Mean? This.

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The Chilean miners stranded down their mine gives an example that OTs can use to communicate the value of occupation.

In a recent BBC article, here, Dr James Thompson, a psychology lecturer at University College London made the point that the priority was not to send anti-depressants to manage a situation but rather that;

“What they need is food and supplies and then systems building up and then to be given tasks to keep them busy.

“Maybe send down some equipment to give them something to do and to keep them involved.”

What a succinct and dramatic way of demonstrating the therapeutic role of occupation.

Written by harrisontraining

September 9, 2010 at 10:51 am

Join Harrison Training for Free Online CPD Training

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Here at Harrison Training we have been looking at using online training facilities as another way of delivering our range of continuing professional development courses for occupational therapists.

We now invite you to join us for a complimentary CPD training session on Thursday 30th September.  We shall be running the presentation twice, at 1pm and again at the early evening slot of 7pm.

The topic will be a new 1 hour course “Communication in Occupational Therapy” exploring how we communicate with our clients and colleagues and the problems we encounter.

This  presentation is packed with stories and practical advice and will enable you to communicate more effectively to save time and improve relationships in your practice.

Attendees will be sent a 1 hour CPD certificate to confirm their participation and supporting notes.

If you would like to join us, at no cost, then contact us for more details.OK

We look forward to sharing this session with you.

OT Blogs, Social Media and Confidentiality

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Salford University’s excellent OT blog had a timely reminder on confidentiality within OT blogging, together with several useful links.  You can read their entry here.

I was reminded of another blog article  had written from outside the OT sphere about a useful test on blogging confidentiality and I share it below.  This blog, as you will see, originated from an indiscreet comment on Twitter, but the test still applies;

“Hey look that’s me!”

I spotted a twitter exchange yesterday that caused me some concern.

A case was being discussed on Twitter that referred to identifying features. No names were mentioned and in that sense, at least, the clients were anonymous.  However, the details being discussed, such as appointments, some figures and issues would have been enough for the clients concerned to identify themselves in a flash.

I cannot recall where I learnt this “Hey look, that’s me!” test for confidentiality.  I do not know if it is enshrined in protocol or case law – perhaps a reader might care to tell us – but it makes perfect sense.

If a client can recognise themselves then that is perhaps the lowest cognitive bar we can set.

That is no reason to disregard that low bar, or dismiss it with an argument that “No-one else would know who it was.”  After all, if the client complains to us or relevant supervising bodies, then that will be more than enough to land us in hot water.

This incident also highlighted another issue.  We need to be diligent ourselves in testing confidentiality, but also in pointing out possible problems to one another.

By doing so we can self police effectively.  The alternative is likely to be a blanket ban or some other hysterical over-reaction.

I hope that if I have such a lapse in future that someone would quickly send me a direct message discretely to point out a possible problem.

I also hope that I would receive it with the same good grace and politeness that my Twitter friend did.

In the words of High School Musical “We’re all in this together…”

Written by harrisontraining

September 2, 2010 at 7:30 am

We make sense of the world depending upon our experiences of it.

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There are a great couple of posts over at the A Voice In The OT Wilderness blog.

Part one is here.

Part two is here.

The story revolves around a conflict arising from a client’s non-compliance with a specified art exercise.  When asked to create a collage, one user, instead, created a 3D model.

This was used by one observer as evidence of that client’s “defiance” – a chilling thought redolent of One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest.  There was a fascinating reason however for the deviation between the expectation of the observer and the interpretation and actions of the client.

The story reminds us that although we might be absolutely clear about communicating what we are asking clients to do, they, being the recipient of the message, receive the message and interpret it through their own filters.

Those filters are, in turn, shaped and coloured by their life experiences.

Go to Allie Hafez’ A Voice In The OT Wilderness blog now and read the story for yourself.

Online Training? Your Thoughts…

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I am looking at what people’s preferences are regarding accessing training online. Can you help?  The more information we have, the better we can tailor our courses to suit your needs.

There are 7 very short multiple choice questions here which will take literally seconds to complete.

Thank you.

Challenge What I Think

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Changing What We Think

I thought was going to write about the NHS Confedration’s consultation paper, and looking in particular at the consortia that service purchasers, previously known as GPs, will be obliged to join.  I might get onto that later.

Instead I got distracted by a curious search that has come up on the blog stats.  It read;

“Challenge what I think”

Someone had searched for “Challenge what I think” and Google, in its infinite algorithmic wisdom sent them here.

That set in motion a chain of thought.  How readily do we open ourselves to being challenged in what we think?

The two topics are not entirely disconnected.  The angle I was contemplating on NHS reform was that it is easy to get stuck in resistance, anger and opposition.  We might rail against the system on the basis that it is

  • Wasteful
  • A broken promise
  • Unnecessary
  • Politically motivated
  • Unworkable
  • Meddling
  • Unwelcome change

or we can recognise that the march of this reform is inevitable.  Once we do that then the challenge is not to change the system or the political tide, but to look to ourselves and change how we are going to respond to it and engage with that change.

Note the word “Respond” as opposed to “React”

For those who are employed within the NHS, then we need to consider our roles within our teams.  How can we bring greater value, not just in pounds and pence, but in contribution?  What skills can we tap into to make our contributions more meaningful?

This has motivated the previous posts about self-effectiveness, or self leadership.  How can we position ourselves as being central to a team’s effectiveness, but not in a destructive way that undermines others, but constructively, helping to support and improve the whole.

For independent practitioners, how are you going to position yourselves in order to market your services to a larger number of smaller purchasers?  What do you need to do to demonstrate utility, effectiveness and ensure (to use the current buzzword) improved outcomes.

The current uncertainty needs us to remain adaptable.  It might mean getting to grips with social media – and the momentum that is now seen within social media and occupational therapy is very exciting.

It might mean, depending on how the consultation goes, that we need to be much more commercial in selling ourselves.

For some, let’s be realistic, it might mean looking for new roles altogether.

All of this needs us to be open to be challenged about the way we think.

We need to break the well worn patterns of X leads to Y and therefore Z applies. Experience shapes our responses so that if we find ourselves facing a situation we anticipate the outcome will the same as last time.  That can often drive how we respond.

And yet the outcome, to some extent, is shaped by our intervening response.  What if we choose, therefore, a different response?

What options have we got to select from?

What responses have we not tried previously and how might they serve us, and our service users and clients, better?

What new responses can we create for ourselves?

For more on this consider the issue of heuristics – there is a good summary on Wikipedia, right here.